Endpoint Agent Views - Browser Sessions

Data collected by an Endpoint Agent from either browsing webpages within domains listed under a monitoring profile from a monitored network, or from manually triggering a recording session, is displayed in the Browser Sessions view under Endpoint Agents > Views for that account group.

This article provides an overview of the Browser Sessions view.

Visited Pages

  1. Add a filter: Search through the collected data from all active user sessions within the selected time period using the following criteria. The selection affects the entire view.

    • Agents:

      • Location: The geographical location of the Endpoint Agent.

      • Connection: The network connection of the Endpoint Agent (e.g. wireless, ethernet, virtual).

      • Network: The network block where the request originated.

      • Monitored Network: Filter by a monitored network as configured under Endpoint Agents > Browser Session Settings.

      • Agent: The individual Endpoint Agent.

      • User: The Endpoint Agent machine user's username, as shown under Endpoint Agents > Agent Settings.

      • Platform: The host OS (e.g., Windows, Mac).

      • Label: Filter by agent label, as configured under Endpoint Agents > Agent Settings > Agent Labels.

    • Destinations:

      • Domain: Filter by the destination domain, as configured under Endpoint Agents > Browser Session Settings.

        • Visited Site: The destination site visited.

      • Destination IP: The IP address of the visited site.

    • Network:

      • Gateway: The IP address of each Endpoint Agent's gateway.

      • Proxy Address: The IP address of the configured proxy server on the Endpoint Agent.

      • VPN Address: The IP address of the VPN endpoint the Endpoint Agent is connected to.

      • SSID: Filter by the wireless SSID.

      • BSSID: Filter by the access point identifier.

      • Errors: Filter by detected errors.

  2. Timeline: Plots a histogram of the selected metric over time, as well as a bar chart of the number of visited web pages across all user sessions. You can use the 24h, 7d and 14d links or drag the tabs to show data over a custom range. Click a time period on the timeline to view data for that period.

  3. Metric: Measurements for the following metrics, averaged over the selected agents, are available under two categories:

    • Network:

      • Loss: End-to-end packet loss. The percentage of packets lost is calculated by subtracting the number of reply packets the agent receives from the target (responses) from the number of packets sent by the agent, then dividing by the number of packets sent, and then multiplying by 100.

      • Latency: The average of the round-trip packet time. Round-trip packet time is the time from which a packet is sent by the agent to the time the agent receives a reply.

      • Jitter: The standard deviation of latency. The standard deviation indicates how widely spread the measurements are around the average. A larger standard deviation indicates a wider spread of measurements.

      • Connection Failures: The number of times the Endpoint Agent failed to establish a TCP connection with the web server or the proxy.

    • Web:

      • Browser Errors: The number of web browsing errors within a specified time interval.

      • Response Time: Also known as time-to-first-byte, this is the time from the beginning of the request (before the DNS request) until the client receives the first byte of the response from the web server.

      • Page Load Time: Indicates how long it takes for a page to fully load in the browser.

      • Experience Score: A rating of a user's experience when loading a particular page. For more on user experience, see Experience Score.

  4. Sessions: A tabulated view of all user sessions for the specified round of data. A session is a continuous interaction of the user within the same browser tab, domain, port and protocol. All pages visited within this interaction are grouped under the same session. Click a user session to view detailed information, as shown below.

    • Computer (1): provides information about the operating system, platform, OS version, browser details, network configuration (IP address, DNS servers), manufacturer, model, and memory information. A typical set of information for a WiFi-connected host machine is shown above.

    • Connection (2): Network type (wired/wireless). For wired connections, the connection type and the link speed are shown. Wireless networks also show the network name, WiFi channel, strength, noise and signal quality, transmission rate and wireless networking standard.

    • Wireless Info (3): Provides detailed information on the wireless connection, as shown below:

    • Path Trace (4): A complete hop-by-hop path, with delay measured at each hop from the host machine running the Endpoint Agent to the targeted domain. The path trace is obtained using ICMP. Gateway and proxy nodes along the path are also shown.

    • VPN (5): VPN Details (if present):

      • Visited Site / Waterfall View (6): A user session is created for each unique web domain visited during the selected time interval. For the visited website, waterfall information for each new page is available. Click on the circular destination node for page title, DOM load time, page load time, and the number of component errors on each page. Click on View Waterfall to see detailed information about each object on the selected page, including object name, domain, size (kB) and time taken to load the object on the page.

  5. Pages: A tabulated view of all the visited sites for the specified round of data. Click a visited site to access the same detailed view shown above.

  6. Overview: Provides the average user experience score for the specified round of data, as shown below:

Network

  1. Metric: Measurements for the following metrics, averaged over the selected agents, are available under two categories:

    • Network:

      • Loss: End-to-end packet loss. The percentage of packets lost is calculated by subtracting the number of reply packets the agent receives from the target (responses) from the number of packets sent by the agent, then dividing by the number of packets sent, and then multiplying by 100.

      • Latency: The average round-trip packet time. Round-trip packet time is the time from which a packet is sent by the agent to the time the agent receives a reply.

      • Jitter: The standard deviation of latency. The standard deviation indicates how widely spread the measurements are around the average. A larger standard deviation indicates a wider spread of measurements.

      • Connection Failures: The number of times the Endpoint Agent failed to establish a TCP connection with the web server or the proxy.

    • System:

      • CPU Load: The average CPU load for the specified round of data.

      • Memory: The average system memory (RAM) load for the specified round of data.

  2. Timeline: Plots a histogram of the selected metric over time, as well as a bar chart of the number of visited web pages across all user sessions. You can use the 24h, 7d and 14d links or drag the tabs to show data over a custom range. Click a time period on the timeline to view data for that period.

  3. Path Visualization: Graphical visualization of the network path, hop by hop, towards the target site. More details on the path visualization view can be found here

  4. Map: The map view (1) shows the geolocation of the agents in a map view (4) and the collected metrics (3). The informational messages above (2) and below (4) below the metrics bars show the number of agents that collected data out of the total checked-in agents for the selected test time interval.

  5. Table: The table view provides a breakdown of the metrics collected per agent for the selected time interval.

User Experience

The experience score rates a user's experience when loading a particular page. The score is calculated based on the time to load the DOM of a page, which is then mapped to a score based on our data set of load times. A score of 100 is the top score, 0 is the lowest score. An average experience is in the range of 44 to 89. Average (mean) experience scores can be displayed by Endpoint Agent, or by domain of pages visited.

How User Experience is calculated

The ThousandEyes experience score is based on formulas and values that are not all visible in the product.

Generally speaking, the score depends on a correlation function of page availability and content speed.

While direct validation from the platform view is not fully realizable from the endpoint display, some quantities are shown in the platform view. A detailed break down is here:

Experience Score

The experience score (ES) is determined by the following formula:

ES = max( 0, PAS - (100 - SS) )

  • The max function is to ensure that the experience score (ES) is always limited between 0 and 100.

  • The above formula allows future adding (or subtracting to be more accurate) impedances to the metric based on other factors (other than speed).

  • The experience score is defined per page.

  • PAS = Page availability score.

  • SS = Speed score.

Page Availability Score

The page availability score (PAS) is a binary score indicating the presence of an error in the page load using the criteria below. Note that this is irrespective of the speed of the page (the speed score). It also does not consider component errors, at least for now.

  • responseCode == -1 : indicates missing information

  • responseCode == 0: indicates a browser error

  • responseCode == 4XX, or 5XX

  • responseCode = 200 but there was a browser error (PAS = 0): For example, loading an error page instead of the expected one.

  • Page load is successful otherwise

Speed Score

The speed score is determined by the formula below:

SS = min( 0, 1 - ( ( Content Time + Redirect Time - X ) / Y ) ) )

  • Content Time: Displayed in ms on the left side of the endpoint view.

  • Redirect Time: Displayed in ms on the left side of the endpoint view. If it is 0 it is not shown.

  • X and Y are based on the OnContentLoad time thresholds which are not visible in the display based on a linear correlation coefficient:

    Very Fast

    : OnContentLoad <= 1s

    → SS = 100

    → SS = 100

    Fast

    : 1s < OnContentLoad <= 2s

    → 89 <= SS < 100

    Average

    : 2s < OnContentLoad <= 6s

    → SS = 100-100*(CT-1)/(10-1)

    → 44 <= SS < 89

    Slow

    : 6s < OnContentLoad <= 10s

    → 0 < SS < 44

    Very Slow

    : 10s < OnContentLoad

    → SS = 0

    → SS = 0